The Good Life France Magazine




The Good Life France Magazine brings you the best of France - inspirational and exclusive features, fabulous photos, mouth-watering recipes, tips, guides, ideas and much more...


Published by the award winning team at The Good Life France

Views
10 months ago

Issue No. 12

Sensational cities to tiny villages, food and wine, culture and heritage. Champagne, an aristocratic saffron grower, Anger, Montparnasse, Morzeine, Carol Drinkwater shares her passion for France. Gorgeous photos and fabulous features will transport you to the heart of France in this brilliant, free magazine...

Garden of the

Garden of the Observatory or Garden of Great Explorers Avenue de l’Observatoire by the Boulevard de Montparnasse. So it is elsewhere in Montparnasse. For all the well-known wonders of Montmartre, there are equally interesting ones in Montparnasse – and usually without the tourist throng. along the Boulevard du Montparnasse is Discover Arty Montparnasse A walk along the nearby Boulevard du Montparnasse is a case in point. Many of the artists attracted by the easy-going village life of Montmartre in the 1860s relocated to Montparnasse after the First World War, drawn by the area’s cafés, cabarets and art schools. Modigliani, for example, once hawked his paintings from table to table at the venerable café Le Dôme, which overlooks what is now Place Pablo Picasso. Just around the corner at 14 Rue de la Grande Chaumière is a private art school that has scarcely changed in a century. Further

Most of Montparnasse is in the 14th Arrondissement (district) of Paris. The Jardin de Luxembourg lies on the border in the 6th Arrdondissement La Coupole, an Art Deco café-cumrestaurant with it's columns painted by artists including Chagall. Further still on Avenue du Maine is the artists’ colony Cité des Arts in a leafy, cobblestoned cul-de-sac. Here 30 artists’ studios were constructed using material salvaged from the Exposition Universelle de Paris de 1900. One of them was rented by Russian painter Marie Vassilieff, who ran a canteen for impoverished painters there, the studios are still in use today.