The Good Life France Magazine




The Good Life France Magazine brings you the best of France - inspirational and exclusive features, fabulous photos, mouth-watering recipes, tips, guides, ideas and much more...


Published by the award winning team at The Good Life France

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10 months ago

Issue No. 25

In this issue, visit France from home - Gascony, and Provence, fabulous day trips from Paris, captivating Toulouse and charming Northern France. Recipes, guides and a whole heap more to entertain and inspire...

In 1901 the Loi of

In 1901 the Loi of Association separated the church and state in France, and the monastery finally met its end. It became a sanatorium, orphanage and asylum. In WWI the French Government turned it over to refugees fleeing Belgium. 5000 people passed through, 600 died there and are buried in the grounds. La Chartreuse has dozens of cloisters, chapels, a library and other rooms. It was once the home of the printing press for all the Charterhouses of Europe 1800s but the equipment was transferred to St Hugh’s Charterhouse (there are plans to have it returned). A huge central courtyard around which are cloisters is dominated by two belfries – one for God and one for man with bells ringing on the hour. The prior of the community was elected every two years from the Fathers and lived in a bigger house overlooking the central courtyard. When they died their bodies were laid to rest in the chapel of death which you can spot by the carved skull over the top of the door. They were buried in a cloth, with no marker, nothing remained of them with their purpose fulfilled – to pray for mankind and to have no ego. Nowadays you can visit and see the beautiful gardens overlooking the Canche Valley but the guided tour (in French but English speakers are given a paper guide to help them) is essential to really appreciate this incredible building. Exhibitions are held in the refractory and regular events take place year round including a Blues Festival in the summer, electro nights and concerts. It’s a fascinating place with a real feeling of spirituality… lachartreusedeneuville.org

La Charteuse, also known as the “Elixir of Long Life” for its alleged medicinal qualities) is apparently made from 130 different local herbs, plants and other botanicals gathered from the mountains around Grenoble. It's matured in oak casks, and the finished liqueur packs quite a punch. The recipe dates back to 1605 and was created by monks at the La Grande Chartreuse in Voiron. It is still made there today, said to be concocted by two monks, the only people in the world who know the heavily guarded recipe. La Chartreuse liqueur If you’re wondering if there’s a link – you’re right. There is. Try a slug of the green stuff in a hot chocolate for a "Verte Chaud" or mix with sparkling water, mint leaves, a little lime juice, 2 teaspoons of sugar and ice to make a classic Chartreuse Mojito...